November Wrap Up

November Wrap UpThis month, I fully expected to manage only one book on my TBR – I’ve been travelling for 23 days and have not had much time to sleep, let alone read! Despite this; I somehow managed to finish 4 books whilst on holiday and another novel during my first week back at work.  Don’t ask how, I can’t quite come to terms with it myself.

 I didn’t take The Immortal life of Henrietta Lacks with me, as it’s not actually my book and I was terrified of ruining it, so I’m back to finishing that off for next month.

 Books Read:

George R.R. Martin – A Storm of Swords: Blood and Gold
John Green – Looking for Alaska
Gillian Flynn – Sharp Objects
Andrew Miller – Pure
Arthur Koestler – Darkness at Noon

Currently Reading:

Rebecca Skloot – The Immortal life of Henrietta Lacks

Total Pages Read: 1840
Total pages read this year: 16,331

 

Quick Overviews:

George R.R. Martin – A Storm of Swords: Blood and Gold

Best book of the series so far; easily in the top three of best reads of this year. An epic read packed full of battles, betrayal, murder, resurrection, magic … just general awesomeness. I would recommend everyone to read all the books just so they could experience this one.

John Green – Looking for Alaska

Another favourite of the year so far – a beautifully written coming-of-age novel that will make you laugh, cry, and ponder over the meaning of life. A definite keeper and a go-to recommendation for anyone that wants it.

Gillian Flynn – Sharp Objects

The second Flynn book I have read this year and – I have to admit – not my favourite. It was very reminiscent of Ice Princess by Camilla Lackberg in terms of plot and, in this case, I think Lackberg out does Flynn on execution.

Andrew Miller – Pure

My least favourite book of the month – Costa Book Award winning Pure had me left wanting from the start. Although beautifully written with intriguing sub-plots; the sum of the parts, albeit exquisite in themselves, became oddly inconsequential.

Arthur Koestler – Darkness at Noon

This is a beautifully written novel centred on the Moscow Show Trials. Darkness at Noon puts the brutality of the regime and the complicity of many of its victims into perspective without condoning or demonising it. Koestler masterfully conveys the claustrophobia and desperation of the prison cell without overworking the narrative.

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